I want a skirt. They seem comfortable.

0 notes

Read More

1 note

(Source: pila-pila, via ruinedchildhood)

9,098 notes

DO i HAVE a post limit?

0 notes

a flute is like a blue burn in a stick

0 notes

Meditation is the Practice of Death

0 notes

Fuera de mi! Cambie la piel!

0 notes

onlypineapple:

comingfromacynic:

and in a related note, why are people (mostly from the left) more worried about telling everyone that ISIS is not representative of Islam instead of condemning their barbaric actions

Why should we give a fuck about ISIS not being representative of islam and not of the…

ironically, the barbaric actions of an extremist group creates barbaric opinions about said group’s choice religion, which then begets its own series of barbaric actions. 

if you have moral standards that find a terrorist group reprehensible, then the same standards should deem the terrorism spawned by cultural hatred equally as shit. hatred of culture is what spawns a terrorist group like isis, after all.

it is also the only resonating effect of isis, save from domestic terrorism which probably won’t happen, that the us will experience. in order to fully understand the negative consequences of isis, how this resonates with american citizens, and how it will affect their day-to-day opinions is critical, and perhaps fundamentally the most important part of all this.

keep in mind that a terrorist organization’s aim is always to force a psychological shift in the way their target views a particular issue. murder is a means to this end. should the impact be as they intended, or should it further suffocate positive images of islam, it would be a victory for them. a victory that is not easily recovered from. 

at the core of this discussion, though, is the idea of placing greater value to one struggle over another. there are people who have died as a result of both of these things (the mislead hatred of islam and isis alike). it’s hard to look at someone who has lost a loved one to either issue and begin quantifying their emotions. 

really, it’s just better to understand them both as separate from one another, and meaningful in their own ways.

Well, it’s not just the barbaric actions of one group. It’s the barbaric actions of all those groups and even goverments that take the Koran seriously. I understand that the two issues are meaningful. That is not my problem. My problem is that by trying to maintain a “good image” of Islam or political correctness or trying to not “offend” someone we can’t condemn this actions for what they are.

"if you have moral standards that find a terrorist group reprehensible, then the same standards should deem the terrorism spawned by cultural hatred equally as shit." Yes and I’ll add that I’ll also find reprehensible the book and the religious belief that could promote said barabaric actions. And we in the West should be openly criticizing the bad parts of Islam, but since we are all so worried about offending someone feelings we then don’t say things like that. I mean, the president had to come out and said that "ISIS is not real Islam". Like come on.

And so those people attacking the real issue (the extreme lecture and understanding of Islam) and saying that this is absolutely condemnable and we shouldn’t even be friends with countries that promote this kind of belief, those voices are then silenced by those (mostly on the left) saying “oh no no, don’t say that about Islam. Islam is not that! you will offend someone”.

Lets call shit what shit is. Promoting hate is not a good thing, of course. But not telling it like it is so we don’t “offend” someone will not do anyone any good and will not promote the change needed in that region and the change needed within Islam.

6 notes

i swear to god i fantasize more about girls dominating me and sitting on my face than about me dominating them

1 note

owning-my-truth:

Full Text on Storify: How US Imperialism Created ISIS

Correction: ISIS was not a subsidiary of Al Qaeda, although there were links between the groups which contributed to its rise before Al Qaeda disavowed ISIS. “ISIS grew out of the former Islamic State of Iraq (ISI), a jihadist militant umbrella group that is believed to have helped create the al-Nusra Front in mid-2011” (x). al-Nusra is al Qaeda’s official arm in Syria.

More Sources:

A short (and incomplete given the scale of US-propagated violence across the globe) account of the myriad ways in which US imperialism directly led to creation of ISIS. US imperialism is never the answer and the US-led coalition now will only destabilize the situation further and lead to even more violence and long term problems in the entire region.

Surely the Koran, ismalic history and islamic law has NOTHING to do with the creation of ISIS, Right?

(via amberroseburr)

2,800 notes

ISIS was created by america? are you serious right now?

ISIS was created by america? are you serious right now?

(Source: oriental-sunrise, via amberroseburr)

358 notes

and in a related note, why are people (mostly from the left) more worried about telling everyone that ISIS is not representative of Islam instead of condemning their barbaric actions

Why should we give a fuck about ISIS not being representative of islam and not of the behadings, treatement of women and genocidal intentions of the group

Is Islam’s public image to the world more important than those crimes? Really?

6 notes

I feel so conflicted when I see people that I usually agree with defending Islam as a worthy belief system. Specially if they are women. I don’t understand it.

0 notes

(Source: mysimpsonsblogisgreaterthanyours, via ruinedchildhood)

446,757 notes

thats-so-meme:

Faces of Vaccine Denialism

1,889 notes